A multiplanet system of super-Earths orbiting the brightest red dwarf star GJ 887

Jeffers, S. V.; Dreizler, S.; Barnes, J. R.; Haswell, C. A.; Nelson, R. P.; Rodríguez, E.; López-Gonz′lez, M. J.; Morales, N.; Luque, R.; Zechmeister, M.; Vogt, S. S.; Jenkins, J. S.; Palle, E.; Berdi ñas, Z. M.; Coleman, G. A. L.; Díaz, M. R.; Ribas, I.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Carter, B. D.; O’Toole, S.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Crane, J. D.; Feng, F.; Shectman, S. A.; Teske, J.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.
Bibliographical reference

Science

Advertised on:
6
2020
Journal
Number of authors
31
IAC number of authors
2
Citations
30
Refereed citations
27
Description
The closet exoplanets to the Sun provide opportunities for detailed characterization of planets outside the Solar System. We report the discovery, using radial velocity measurements, of a compact multiplanet system of super-Earth exoplanets orbiting the nearby red dwarf star GJ 887. The two planets have orbital periods of 9.3 and 21.8 days. Assuming an Earth-like albedo, the equilibrium temperature of the 21.8-day planet is ~350 kelvin. The planets are interior to, but close to the inner edge of, the liquid-water habitable zone. We also detect an unconfirmed signal with a period of ~50 days, which could correspond to a third super-Earth in a more temperate orbit. Our observations show that GJ 887 has photometric variability below 500 parts per million, which is unusually quiet for a red dwarf.
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